Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Ashmolean − Eastern Art Online, Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

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Hillside with rocks and a clump of trees

  • Description

    This composition is similar to many of the drawings Xu Bing made of scenery north of the Great Wall around the village of Shouliang Gou, where he lived between 1974 and 1977 as an urban youth sent to the countryside for re-education. Those drawings, like Jean-François Millet’s sketch here, were also on unconventional papers; materials were scarce, and Xu Bing used wrapping paper from the commune supplies.

  • Details

    Associated place
    Europe France (Cusset) (place of creation)
    EuropeFrance Seine-et-Marne Barbizon (possible place of creation)
    Europe France (Cusset) (subject)
    Date
    1866 - 1867
    Artist/maker
    Jean-François Millet (1814 - 1875) (artist)
    Material and technique
    recto: paper, printed verso: graphite, pen and brown ink, touched with green and yellow crayon
    Dimensions
    sheet 10.9 x 15.4 cm (height x width)
    Material index
    Technique index
    Object type index
    No. of items
    1
    Credit line
    Bequeathed by Dr Grete Ring, 1954.
    Accession no.
    WA1954.70.33
  • Further reading

    Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 28 February-19 May 2013, Xu Bing Landscape/Landscript: Nature as Language in the Art of Xu Bing, Shelagh Vainker, ed. (Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 2013), no. 20 on p. 55, pp. 16, 52, 155, illus. p. 55 fig. 20

Past Exhibition

see (1)

Location

    • Western Art Print Room

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